Archive for the ‘Purple food’ Category

beauty concept skin aging. anti-aging procedures, rejuvenation, lifting,Okinawan Japanese love of ‘purple sweet potatoes’ is good news for Sujon’s blackcurrant consumers concerned about aging!

A UK research team visited the Island of Okinawa in Japan and spent a lot of time talking to the Okinawans. They wanted to understand how and why Okinawans seemed to age better than virtually any other social group on earth. Brain disease amongst the Okinawans was 50% that of Western societies; they had on average 80% less chance of a heart-related health issue than Western societies; and they lived longer.

The Okinawan diet was believed to hold the key for their elevated anti-aging health statistics with Okinawan’s eating an extraordinary amount of purple sweet potatoes: on average half a KG each per day.

The research team was headed by Dr Paul Kroon, of the Institute for Food Research, Norwich University, in the United Kingdom. Dr Kroon explained in the interview that he believed the anthocyanin’s in the sweet potatoes were the cause of the benefits. Anthocyanin’s give foods a distinctive vibrantly purple colour.

According to Dr Kroon’s research Purple Sweet Potatoes contain 53mg/100gm of anthocyanin’s. Other foods tested by the team were: blueberries 161mg/100gm; blackberries 161mg/100gm; aubergine 86mg/100gm; red cabbage 40mg/100gm. But they found that the star of the purple food group were blackcurrants with an exceptional 592mg/100gm.

Dr Kroon’s advice for Western societies was to enjoy more purple food in the diet and especially blackcurrants.

Sujon’s frozen blackcurrants (available throughout NZ in supermarkets) and Sujon Blackcurrant powder (available on-line or in most health food stores) are rich in purple anthocyanin’s! Both can be enjoyed as part of a regular balanced nutritional diet.

Important: the above information addresses the topic of aging and will be of strong interest to many Sujon blog-readers. It certainly signals an exciting nutritional concept. But it is important to stress the following:

•The research is indicative of a possible value to humans but nothing is proven yet.

•The amount of blackcurrants needed to provide any possible value to humans isn’t known yet and people should enjoy blackcurrants as part of a balanced diet of many foods; especially fruits and vegetables.

•Readers should not use the above information in any way to treat themselves without discussing first with their medical advisor.

‘The Berryblogger’.

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